CENTRAL ASIA: “I Want to Know What I am Saying”

Source: Operation Mobilization, October 7, 2017

Islam is considered part of one’s cultural identity in much of Central Asia. However, many people leave religious practice to the elderly. Often, when people turn 50, they begin searching for forgiveness of sins. For Muslims, that means going to the mosque.

Aslan’s mother was no exception. An older woman looking for spiritual peace, she had started attending a mosque and reciting Islamic prayers. But she wanted a translation of the Arabic prayers. “I am [Central Asian], and I want to know what I am saying to God,” she told a Muslim religious leader.

During that time, some relatives living in a nearby city approached Aslan’s mother. “We found a group of people who are reading, worshipping, and praying in our language. Can we go and see these people?”

The discovery of that Central Asian church transformed Aslan’s family. His mother, touched by prayer and teaching she could understand, became a believer. Over the next seven years, the rest of the family followed.

» Full story illustrates how Scripture and related literature distribution is making a difference in Central Asia.

» You might also appreciate and want to share the following articles about helping people discover God’s Word for themselves: Frontiers workers involved in a Bible discussion group explain Why We Stopped Leading; a Pioneers worker in West Africa often asks, Can I Tell You a Story?

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